Putting it in writing

Karalee’s Post #123

I willI’ve missed a couple of weeks of blogging. Sometimes unexpected things happen in life that changes your perspective and stuff that seemed important really isn’t. These things change one’s perspective and even one’s view of the subject matter in one’s writing.

This has happened to me. I’m making adjustments in my writing too. My short stories may take on a completely different bent from my norm of mystery, especially murder mystery.

I’ve committed to 5 short stories in 5 months. Five in five. Sounds quick. Almost easy. Go ahead, say it. Five in five. It has a good ring to it. Sounds almost lyrical. Must be easy. Right?

It’s easy to write down. But, once it’s down, well, it’s in writing! Suddenly it’s a stronger commitment than a thought kept between the ears immersed deep in my grey matter where no one but oneself has a clue about it.

That got me thinking. Putting something in writing can easily be a one-liner (unless you’re a lawyer, and I believe that’s an impossibility). What that one-liner can represent though, can demand a HUGE amount of work behind the scenes. HUGE.

Here’s what I mean:

Things that are easy to jot down:

  1. I will write a novel in 5 months.
  2. I will write 5 short stories in 5 months.
  3. I will run a marathon.
  4. I will quit eating sugar.
  5. I will visit my mother for a week.

What those things really mean:

  1. I will sit at my computer for hours, HOURS, making stuff up; outlining; mind mapping; researching history, science, backstory, and character development; PLUS manage all the other aspects of my life like a job, cooking and eating and doing the dishes; PLUS actually writing 1000 words a day of good stuff that adds conflict and character development and moves the story forward.
  2. Ditto for 1 above x 5 minus the big word count.
  3. Starting 3 to 4 months before the marathon I will run 4 days a week building up time and distance slowly to a good 4 hour run 10 days before the race; work on interval and weight training the other days; eat properly which means more time shopping and cooking and doing dishes; and get a proper sleep every night. Oh, go to work every day too!
  4. This is a mind and body game that can drive a person mad. Substituting with salads and other good home-cooked meals means more shopping, cooking and dishes. Distracting oneself by writing, reading, gardening, watching TV, sitting on one’s hands, or training for a marathon to remove oneself from temptation can take hours of time.
  5. This one takes lots of prep. Phone calls, multiple times to arrange and remind said mother. Then there’s organizing my house affairs to leave, packing clothes and dogs, driving 14 hours, visiting and spending all day helping sort my mother’s house and garden, looking after the dogs, driving home again only to get my house back in order.

See what I mean? All these activities started out as a simple one-liner. Each represents an immense amount of work.

In conclusion I must say that the moral of this post is that when you put something down in writing, make sure you are a lawyer so you get paid for it!

______________________________________________

Short Story Progress:   I’m thinking of themes and am inclined to write outside my box.

Perspective Photos:

Vancouver fog

 

 

 

 

 

 

airplane landing

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Happy writing.

 

7 thoughts on “Putting it in writing

  1. Loved your post, Karalee. Love this blog and apologize for being absent for some time. Finished up Crafting Titles (for sale, guys), and like you said above, the forces of non-writing obligations. I’ve been giving myself a stern talking to, however, and “write it down,” a contract, makes great sense. I think of comparisons like, I have to cook, wash the dishes, and walk the dog twice a day, so why can’t I take the equivalent time and do that much writing? Zen question.

    • Great to hear from you Elizabeth! I downloaded your new book and am intrigued as I have 5 titles to come up with and have spent hours in the past trying to think and research the “right fit” for my story.
      Many people, may I say most, need to set deadlines and make TO DO lists to achieve their goals. Putting them down in writing does have a psychological commitment to it. Making writing worthy of our time has to be internalized and voiced.
      Congratulations on getting another book written and published! 🙂

  2. You’re right … every simple-sounding commitment comes with a myriad of strings attached! I’ve often thought if people really thought in advance about the commitments involved with having children, for instance, we’d never have to worry about overpopulation.

    On the other hand, commitments like writing or running a marathon are aspirational: big challenges that we dream of mastering. And if dreams were all subjected to judgement in the court of reason, we certainly would not have the Sistine Chapel, or “War and Peace”, or movies, or computers, or a space program. We probably wouldn’t even have the wheel!

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