SiWC – The Best of Times (Plus more cool links!)

Ah, that Budda guy, he knew what he was talking about.

Ah, that Budda guy, he knew what he was talking about.

Ever have one of those days that just goes right?

I don’t often get them.

I usually get the type of day where you have to get a boy to an early morning hockey practice and set your alarm for 5pm instead of 5am practice, then, already late, you hit every red light on the way, then forgot some vital piece of hockey gear like the jock, then you have to race back, but find you didn’t fill up the car and HAVE to get gas or you’re not making it home, then you find your credit card is maxed and you only have nickels and dimes to pay for gas, but you put in $1.35 anyway and race off only to return to a completely empty room because the team has been relocated to another dressing room and you have to go room to room carrying a jock and asking, has anyone seen ma boi?

No?

Well, try it sometime.

But it wasn’t one of those days at the Surrey International Writers’ Conference. Everything went my way. I managed to get an additional agent appointment early in the day and still had one tucked away for the afternoon. So, after my success with the first agent, the incredibly nice Elizabeth Winick Rubinstein, President and senior agent at McIntosh & Otis, I saw another opening.

A great read from a great author, Michael Slade

A great read from a great author, Michael Slade

Not with an agent, but with a writer who has always given me great advice. The great storyteller Michael Slade.

So I booked a moment with him, a ten-minute session called a blue pencil (where an author looks at your work, gives you criticism, then you go home and cry a lot). But I wanted his opinion on the opening of my book, especially since I had plans to submit it for a public reading on Saturday and didn’t want to be that guy who gets his stuff read and has agents rolling their eyes and shaking their heads and wondering why they make the effort to come out.

However, Mr. Slade loved the writing and went through the first chapter step-by-step remarking on all the things I’d done right. He only had one suggestion, but that one was bang on (and as soon as I left, I made that change right away.) But as much fun as that was, (and it was FUN), he didn’t have any appointments afterward so we talked about war and fathers and writing and all sorts of things.

For about over an hour!

Like we were long, lost friends.

They had to kick us out for lunch, but it was so incredible to have that time with someone who’s farther down the road than me as a writer and such a great storyteller.

Then it was back to work. I needed to find another agent at lunch, the best writing coach I’ve seen and perennial favorite at SiWC, Don Maass, but by the time I arrived, the whole ballroom was filled to capacity and I couldn’t spot him. So I ate my lunch, chatted with my writer’s group, chatted with people in line, chatted with a few of the people seated at our table, then when lunch ended, I began my search again.

Luckily, someone had nabbed him before he could leave!

Again, I felt so nervous as I approached him. I trembled like an 11-year-old girl about to meet Scott Helman (look him up, I had to!).

It’s that fight or flight thing. I really wanted to run and hide in my basement, snuggle under a blanket and read my books in the pool of lamplight, but I had put on my big boy pants and needed to do big boys things.

I marched over and sat beside him. Like an awkward orangutan fidgeting with everything he could get his hands on, I waited until he had finished talking to others, then with only minutes left before he had to rush off to a workshop or scheduled interviews, I threw my pitch at him with all the skill of someone just clubbed in the head with a baseball bat.

But he liked it. He wanted to see the entire manuscript. Entire. Manuscript!

Win!

The editor I saw after that, while challenging me on if my story was a mystery or thriller, wanted to see 50 pages after I was done sweating and mumbling.

Win!

Not a pretty one, but a win never-the-less.

Anne Frank - Who cannot be moved by her story?

Same thing happened when I pitched at the end of the day to Irene Goodman, who was so very kind and understanding at my complete inability to form complete sentences at that point.

She loved my story’s connection to the holocaust and we shared our moving experiences from when we visited Anne Frank’s house or the holocaust memorial museums.

Another win!

I went home exhausted and so excited.

But an even bigger win was to come. Not a sale, cuz those things don’t happen at conferences, but something I’ll remember forever. In a good way.

******

More links!

Writer – Michael Slade (check out his books here!)

Agent – Don Maass (His new book on writing, The Emotional Craft of Fiction is coming out in January, Here. But he has some amazing writing books already out.)

Agent – Elizabeth Winick Rubinstein

Agent – Irene Goodman (a great article hereIf You Want to Be a Writer, Be a Writer)

 

 

 

 

 

Back home to the Surrey briar patch

5 writers members at SIWC 2010 with James Scott Bell and Carolyn Swayze

This weekend, the 5 writers join the hundreds of other aspiring writers – and the generous agents, editors, publishers and bestselling authors who support us – at our favourite annual literary get-together: the Surrey International Writers’ Conference.

Why do we love Surrey? Well, like B’rer Rabbit and the briar patch, we were born and bred here, so our brave critique group members know no fear at SIWC. Not at our blue pencils. Not at our pitches. Not even at SIWC Idol. It’s all part of the learning curve – and besides there’s a very nice bar where we can always drown our sorrows when necessary.

Three of us at SIWC 2009 with writing buddy Jo Cooper

Here at the event that’s been called “the best writers’ conference in North America” by presenters and participants alike, we get to take master classes with the best of the best, like authors Jack Whyte, Hallie Ephron, Michael Slade and Robert Sawyer. We get to pitch top agents like Don Maass, Nephele Tempest, Jill Marr and Dean Cooke. We get to learn from great editors, film industry professionals, social media experts and writers in all genres (far too many to mention here, but it’s a weekend full of awesome talent).

So how did our writing group start? A few years ago, our group’s founder (and now famous bestselling author!), Sean Slater, decided to cherry-pick some likely co-conspirators from among the local writers he met at SIWC to form a critique group. Since that time, there have been a few changes in membership, including Sean’s “graduation” to the big leagues, but the spirit of mutual support is still alive and well.

Sean’s first published crime novel in his Jacob Striker series was The Survivor (2011, Simon & Schuster), which was nominated for the Arthur Ellis Award for Best First Novel. It was translated into multiple languages and has sold like hotcakes in Canada, Great Britain and Europe. His first success was quickly followed by a second Jacob Striker outing, Snakes & Ladders, and Sean now awaits the publication of book number three. Oh, and did we mention that Sean is also a police officer who managed to establish himself front-and-centre on the bookshelves of several countries while holding down one of the world’s toughest jobs?

Sean, you’re our hero.

And fortunately for our group of 5 writers (the ones who have not yet been published), Sean still acts as our informal advisor, provides inspiration, and came up with the kick-ass idea of having us all write brand new novels to a deadline – triggering this 5 Writers 5 Novels 5 Months madness.

Gee, thanks, Sean. We think.

Seriously, though, Sean was right. After a couple of years critiquing each others’ works-in-progress in 30-page monthly increments (and producing several completed first draft novels along the way), the 5 writers needed a shake-up. We all love to write, but we’ll love getting published even better. This game is not for the passive. We needed to kick it up a notch … demand more of ourselves … re-kindle that fire in the belly that makes you uncomfortable, keeps you up at night, pushes you to do more than you ever thought you could. Yessirree. The 5 writers challenge is all that and more.

Paula and Joe with our muse at SIWC 2010

The question is: will we survive it?

(Note that Sean is a very generous guy, and readily shares his experiences with aspiring writers. Visit his website, www.seanslaterbooks.com, not only for the latest on his novels and his soaring career, but also for advice on getting published and other writing challenges.)

But back to SIWC. For those of you who might be reading this blog while attending the conference, we’d love to hear from you. Tap us on the shoulder if you see one of us. Leave a comment on our blog and tell us what you think. And by all means follow us as we slog and blog our way forward to “The End” by our self-imposed deadline of February 5, 2013.

Karalee, Helga, Silk and Paula at SIWC 2010 Idol

And even though the 5 writers are, at this moment, still unpublished wannabes – like many other SIWC attendees – we offer our own advice from our writing group experience. Look around you. Are you seeing some of the same faces at all the workshops you attend? Introduce yourself. You may be talking to a fellow writer who can become a friend, an inspiration, maybe even a member of your future critique group. Having the support of a like-minded, and demanding, group really does help spark the courage needed to take on both creative risks and crazy commitments.

We hope all who attend SIWC 2012 really do take away the courage, inspiration and commitment needed to be a better writer. A published writer. We want to sincerely thank all the organizers, the volunteers, and the mentors who share their knowledge and time with us at this wonderful conference.

Write on!