Guest post by Sheila Watson: Fear

Joe’s Post #136

Actually, I’m not sure I can call this my post as I’m going to give the blog over to a guest blogger. I hope that other people will also be interested in blogging on our site, so please send us a note if you are. In the meantime, Sheila Watson was fortunate enough to take a workshop on something we’ve all been struggling with over the last few months. FEAR!

So, here it is. It has some great insights.

Part 1 (the 2nd part will be next week)

FEAR ˈfir/    noun

  1. 1. an unpleasant emotion caused by the belief that someone or something is dangerous, likely to cause pain, or a threat.

The key word in the above definition is “belief”.  Fear, as it relates to writing, is not real.  There is no danger or threat in telling a story and no disaster will ever befall you because you write a novel.

Those of us who are writers can’t help but write.  If we are not writing a novel, we are writing a blog or crafting status updates on Facebook or responding to discussions on forums or emailing and texting our friends and family.  There are hundreds of ways of writing daily.  And we manage to do all of them – except the writing that matters most.  Because we are afraid.

Why aren’t we afraid to write a blog?  Why is it that we set a goal to write a blog every week and we manage to get it done and published?  Every single week.  But when we say we are going to commit to writing a novel a year – a snail’s pace of merely 275 words a day – we can’t get it done?  Why aren’t we afraid of writing a blog?

Because there is nothing dangerous or threatening about writing a blog.  What’s the worst thing that could happen if you wrote a blog and put it out in the world?  Someone might not like it?  Someone might disagree with it?  No one will read it?  Maybe someone will write about the same idea and be better at it?

So what?  Is that what you are thinking?  So what if no one reads it?  So what if someone disagrees or doesn’t like it?  So what if someone writes better than I do?  It doesn’t matter.

That same idea – that feeling – needs to translate into the writing of your “real” stuff.  It’s the same.  You are just another person putting stories out into the world and seeing what resonates.  Some people won’t read it.  Some people won’t like it.  Some people will write it better than you.

So what?

You are already facing and managing this fear when you write a blog, or an email or a forum post or a witty Facebook status.  You just have to bring that to your “real” writing.

How much could you write if you were not afraid?  If you could sit down at the laptop with no beliefs of danger or threat or pain clouding your thoughts and you could just tell a story?

Do you know?

I didn’t. Not until this weekend. This weekend I set about writing a story for my teenaged children.

They still request an Easter Egg Hunt every year and we are long past hiding chocolate eggs behind the curtains.  So each year, this mom devises an increasingly difficult hunt.  This year, I decided to write a “choose your own adventure” for them.  The idea being that they read a story and at certain points in the story they have to decide between option 1 or option 2 (and sometimes options 3 and 4).  Seemed like a good idea.  But it required a story.  I started writing on Friday night.  And I wrote more than 11,000 words by Sunday morning.

11,000 words. In a day and a half.  Because I was not afraid.

*****

Bio: Sheila Watson is a wife, a mom, a self-defense instructor, a 2nd degree black belt in Taekwon-do, a wanna-be chef, a dog companion and a writer of tall tales, fanciful stories, occasionally useful commentary and rather wordy status updates.

Stay tuned, she has a second part coming next week!

As always, if you like the post, please follow us or share on FB or get your 8 year old daughter to do something with it on instasnap or chatlink or whatever’s new.

 

Researching no research

Joe’s Post #121

Research – is it even necessary?

Ok, here’s the thing. I’ve always believed in making sure you got it right. Like measuring twice before banging your finger with the hammer. Or ensuring the porn you download doesn’t have a virus.

You know, the important things.

So getting the research right on any novel is very important to me. For my mystery in the California desert, I went down there, stood in the baking sun, tasted the dust, smelled the creosote, listened to how people spoke and even talked to a cop or two.

veniceFor my fantasy novel, I drew on Venice’s amazing history and deliberately stole all the details I remember (or imagined) from when I visited the place.

Easy stuff, really.

This new novel, though, I have some work to do. Holland. 1940. Gosh. The list of what I don’t know is massive. So my research began.

As part of it, I began to read books written about that time. Tamar was one of them, the book I’m currently reading.

Here’s the thing.

It has no world building. It could be England. It could be the 50s or 60s (except for the fact the hero is parachuting into Holland and is afraid of being killed by Germans). The extent of the details are things like, he saw a rook. He went to the Maartin’s farm. She put on a coat. They went into the barn. He turned on the wireless.

Are the German uniforms described? The bikes they ride? The feel of heat after a cold night?

Is anything described through the eyes of the character?

No, not really. He’s almost comatose.

And this book became a best-seller?

Why?

Maybe it was the characters.

Nope, pretty standard fare. Nothing outstanding. No real personalities, just, you know, normal people (which is very accurate, historically, but boring as hell).

So, if you pardon my language, what the fuck?

This one is a complete mystery to me. I’d like to show this to Don Maass and say, for the love of God, why did this one sell? I want to know. I really want to know.

But, in the end, it’s a lesson in book publishing. I must remember, I must have this tattooed to some part of my body normally covered by a bathing suit, that this is a subjective business. Someone, somewhere, loved this book, bought it, edited it, marketed it and sold it. Readers loved it. Or at least enough of them for it to do well.

tamarIf someone has read Tamar, please let me know what you thought. Maybe it was something I missed. Like a secret code or something.

For me, however, books like this bother me. I’ve been told that I have to build a world that my readers can immerse themselves in, that take them to another time and place. And that’s why this one bugs me. It breaks that rule in a big way.

It’s like you’ve been told if you’re good, Santa will bring presents. Then you see someone who’s peed on the teacher’s cat and set fire to the Smokey the Bear sign, and HE got a present from Santa, too???

WTF?

So, let me ask you, is it really necessary?

************

Best Show Last Week – “Interstellar”. However, it was a movie too complex for my small brain. Event horizons. Black holes. Time dilation. Still, it had moments of sheer brilliance and I hate to say it, but Matthew McConaughey acts his balls off.

Book That I’m Reading At the Moment – Tamar – In a perfect world, I would set this aside and read something else, but my OCD is bad when it comes to my need to finish a book (or movie.)

Outlines done – 0

Pages written on new book  0

#Class taken on blogging 3

# of new friends made on Twitter – 7 (hmmm, have I neglected twitter? She is such a needy thing, she is.)

# books ordered for research – 1

Health – Better.

Best thing last week – Connecting with people who have been in Holland during the war. More of that this week, and I’ll be writing about that experience next week.

Worst thing – Still be massively confused about wordpress.org. It is a serious time-sink to get all the widgets and plugins and and SEOs and themes all figured out.